She Doesn’t Have The Range

The best part of 70s (and a bit beyond) futuristic/post-apocalyptic sci-fi movies are the pay phones.

Pretend to be surprised that this in some way had to do with the original Planet of the Apes series. Do it. Pretend! Also pretend I could find the picture I wanted, which is where Brent has a much less climactic realization that he is indeed on earth when he goes underground and finds himself in the NY subway system – the first clue to which is a destroyed and decayed payphone.

It’s one of those things that can send me deep into splintered and all-encompassing thought, tho, seriously. For so many reasons. It’s the idea that because we keep moving forward (which we’ll argue some other time), we can’t imagine what will exist moving forward. We can’t stop at any particular moment and project the future from that point, because the world or at least the way interact with it changes so drastically in such a short period of time. If today I made a film about tomorrow and tomorrow I made a film about the day after, they would not be film one and sequel, they’d be more related stories of potential futures in separate dimensions. If I make a future cast from this moment, I almost have to stay *in* this moment for that future to be “true.” Remarkable.

It’s why I am so intrigued by vintage scifi films, but also projects like Beyond the Black Rainbow, which was made in 2010 but made as though in the 80s at theĀ  latest. I feel like I’ve talked about this movie before. When I find someone who likes long stretches and excruciatingly slow builds, I will know that I’ve found my soulmate. Or wait. Perhaps I already have.

 

…He likes long, quiet stretches.

Tomorrow – or my version of it which has yet to be determined – I will tell you what’s the haps with me, with Avrilis, with writing… yeah, just with writing. Stay out the rest of my business, kids, k, byeeeeeeeeeeeeee.